Identifying Climate Adaptive Solutions to Displacement in Somalia

Identifying Climate Adaptive Solutions to Displacement in Somalia

Africa
NC.0026
SO10P0508
100,000
Somalia
Migration, Environment and Climate Change
National
Active

Somalia has seen a protracted humanitarian crisis since the outbreak of the civil war in 1991. Forced displacement has occurred in Somalia in part as a response to over 20 years of internal conflict. Environmental challenges, including land degradation and periods of acute drought, have compounded the effects of conflict. Currently, more than 2.6 million Somalis are internally displaced. Of these, 1.6 million have been displaced due to drought since 2016. Climate change increases the risk of natural hazards and places additional strain on livelihoods. Having limited capacity to cope with climate change related losses, women and girls face additional risks that affect their natural capital and agricultural productivity. As the impacts of climate change increase, the work predominantly undertaken by women and girls (food production, supplying household water, collecting fuel for heating and cooking, etc.) becomes increasingly more difficult. Due to the country’s low adaptive capacity and geographic location, Somalia is considered one of the most vulnerable countries in the world to climate change.  To build on recent the progress, the IOM and UNEP will support the Federal Government of Somalia by deepening understanding of the linkages between environmental degradation, climate change and migration in Somalia and identifying viable long-term policies to address Somalia’s displacement crisis. Key recommendations for further action will be developed as entry points for supporting the Government of Somalia to address urban displacement through the provision of recommendations, as well as, strategic interventions to building the resilience of communities to climate change.